keynote KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

 

OPENING KEYNOTE SPEAKER (24th Feb):

The Technologist’s Guide to Hitchhiking

Seb RoseSeb Rose

@Sebrose

Are you assessed according to the professional development plan you submitted at last year’s appraisal? Where will you be in five year’s time? Have you ever been hitchhiking?

While it’s important to acquire relevant knowledge and skills to further your career, it’s also useful to occasionally reflect on the role that serendipity plays in all our lives. I’m not talking about loosely thought out escapist dreams or delegating your career to a higher power. The best professionals and business people are those that are able to take advantage of opportunities when they arise – something that observers often characterise as luck. If it is luck then, to some extent, we make our own luck.

You may be wondering where hitchhiking comes into this. In part, it’s through the long relationship that technologists have had with the work of Douglas Adams and the number 42. Hitchhiking is also a good metaphor for the development of a career in technology, incorporating all the elements of forecasting and preparation, but combining them with massive unpredictability.

I’ll draw on over 30 years of software development (and hitchhiking) to encourage you to both loosen up and apply yourself.

About Seb

Consultant, coach, designer, analyst and developer for over 30 years. Seb has been involved in the full development lifecycle with experience that ranges from Architecture to Support, from BASIC to Ruby. Recently he has been helping teams adopt and refine their agile practices, with a particular focus on collaboration and automated testing.

Seb is the lead author of “The Cucumber for Java Book” (Pragmatic Programmers) and a contributing author to “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” (O’Reilly). He has written for many online journals, including Agile Connection, Simple Talk and the Prose Garden. He has spoken at dozens of UK and international conferences, including Software Architect (London), XP (Vienna & Rome), Agile 2014 (Orlando), Java One (San Francisco), NDC (Oslo), Agile Testing Days (Potsdam) and Eurostar (Maastricht).

 

ELITE SPONSOR UEA CompSci PRESENTATION (24th Feb):

Building a Curriculum to Educate the Software Developers of Tomorrow

Joost NoppenJoost Noppen, Lecturer in Software Engineering, School of Computing Sciences, UEA

@JARNoppen

Software development is one of the fastest moving disciplines in the world with new technologies, insights and development methods emerging on a regular basis. The challenge for universities, such as UEA, in training talent and providing the next generation of leading developers lies in providing a curriculum that covers a solid foundation of insight and problem solving skills, as well as incorporating these new developments. In this talk I will cover how the School of Computing Science goes about designing, implementing and updating an educational program that covers all these areas. I will cover our use of transferable skills, how we select the programming languages and tools we teach, and how our collaboration with industry allows us to update and complement the material we deliver. From this talk it will become clear that the unique nature of the IT industry poses a unique challenge for university education where collaboration with industry is a key component to success.

About Joost

Joost Noppen is lecturer in Software Engineering at the University of East Anglia in Norwich. Joost holds an MSc and a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Twente in the Netherlands, with a special focus on computational intelligence in Software Engineering. Joost has held positions in leading Software Engineering research groups across Europe, such as the École des Mines and the University of Lancaster, where he has worked in international research projects. In 2008 Joost was awarded a prestigious Marie Curie Intra-European fellowship from the EU for his work on Software Product Line development.

Within the School of Computing Sciences Joost is responsible for the Software Engineering aspect of the teaching curriculum. He has been responsible for the complete redesign of the Software Engineering modules and bringing them up to date with state of the art in industrial software design and academic research. His modules focus on providing students with the fundamental skills for software development, such as object-orientation, and agile and test-driven development, combined with research-led topics and novel developments in industry such as mobile applications and software product lines.

Joost has over 14 years’ experience in Software Engineering both from an academic and industrial perspective. He has founded a successful web development company as a student and he has developed software in collaboration with multi-national companies. In his spare time Joost is exploring the application of Software Engineering principles to mobile games development practice.

Currently Joost is involved in a variety of Software Engineering activities both related to research and teaching and he is happy to be approached for projects in these areas. He is also available for consultancy, advice and assessment in the field of industrial software engineering.

 

ELITE SPONSOR UEA CompSci PRESENTATION (25th Feb):

Gerard Parr, Head of UEA CompSci

@Sebrose

 

CLOSING KEYNOTE SPEAKER (24th Feb):

Are you ready for the coming revolution?

RusselWinderRussel Winder

@russel_winder

UK school curriculum underwent a revolution as of 2014-09: ITC was replaced with programming (aka computer science). Whilst the change itself was campaigned for, and widely wanted, the way government handled the change left a lot to be desired. Some, but not all, universities and colleges have joined in realizing the change and preparing for the consequent revolution in university computer science curriculum, c.2018 onwards. Are businesses ready for the knock-on change?

This presentation will delve into some of the most important and/or obvious issues surrounding this world leading experiment in child education.

Ex-academic, Analyst & consultant Russel talks about the important issues surrounding the government’s push for programming in UK schools, and how the way it’s been handled has left a lot to be desired.

From 2015 ICT in UK schools is to be replaced with programming, but the way the government handled the change left a lot to be desired. Russel talks about some of the most important and obvious issues surrounding this world leading experiment in child education.

About Russel

Ex-theoretical physicist, ex-UNIX system programmer, ex-academic. Now an independent consultant, analyst, author, expert witness and trainer. Also doing startups. Interested in all things parallel and concurrent. And build.

Actively involved with Groovy, GPars, GroovyFX, SCons, Me TV, and GStreamer. Also Gradle, Ceylon, Kotlin, D, Go, and bit of Rust. And lots of Python, especially Python-CSP.

 

SATURDAY KEYNOTE SPEAKER (25th Feb):

From Coda to Code: The SupaPass Journey

JullianaMeyerJuliana Meyer

@julianameyer

Join us to discover the tech startup story, that began from a bedroom in Norwich with a vision for a more efficient rewarding future for creatives, and has led to a globally recognised tech platform working with artists from major record labels.

About Juliana

Juliana Meyer is Founder and CEO of SupaPass, the fair-trade music streaming app.  SupaPass gives anyone with a fanbase their own subscription streaming service.  Fans subscribe to a specific creator’s channel from £1 per month and creators earn up to 100% net revenue share of their fan subscriptions.

Juliana founded SupaPass to give efficient, fair, transparent revenue from streaming for artists, labels and publishers.  Working with global artists like Grammy Award-winning Imogen Heap, SupaPass is exploring cutting edge technology including Blockchain.

Prior to founding SupaPass, Juliana Meyer ran her own label and was an award-winning singer-songwriter, including writing Norfolk’s Official Olympic Song for the 2012 Olympics.  She also has a Masters Engineering Degree from Oxford University.  One of the first steps in founding SupaPass was co-founding SyncNorwich in order to find and build the team.

SCHOOL FOCUSSED DAY SATURDAY KEYNOTE SPEAKER (23rd Feb):

“Whoops”, and other classic programming phases

DomDavisDom Davis

@Idomdavis

Schools now teach algorithms and programming from the age of 5, so it’s hardly rocket science. Except when it is. And even when it isn’t it goes wrong a lot. I should know, I’ve been responsible for some of that wrongness. The trick is to learn from your mistakes, and to make sure that when it goes wrong, it does so in a way that no one will notice, and definitely not in the ways I’m going to spend this session talking about.

About Dom

Dom Davis is a veteran of The City and a casualty of The Financial Crisis. Not content with bringing the world to its knees he then went off to help break the internet before winding up in Norfolk where he is now CTO and technology evangelist at a rapidly growing startup. Dom is an enthusiastic and impassioned speaker [read: he gabbles] who uses a blend of irreverent sarcasm and flippant humour to bring complex subjects to a broad audience. Whether or not they understand him is up for debate, but he likes to believe they do.

 


Tecb TECH TRACK

Get Kata

Kevlin Henney

@KevlinHenney  

Coding katas are a way that programmers can kick the tires of their programming languages, paradigms and practices. Typically anchored in a TDD cycle, katas are typically simple problems that give programmers the opportunity to exercise deliberate practice and explore different approaches, whether programming style, pair programming or test-first programming. But the simplicity can be deceptive, with many programmers tiring of these katas too soon, missing out on some of the more mind-bending and paradigm-expanding opportunities on offer. This session will pick on a couple of katas and dig deeper into TDD, lambdas, language(s), (dys)functional programming and Alcubierre drive.

About Kevlin

Kevlin is an independent consultant, trainer, reviewer and writer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for various magazines and websites, a contributor to open source software and a member of more committees than is probably healthy. Kevlin is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series. He is also editor of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know.

 

If You’re Happy And You Know It (Inside the mind of a developer)

DomDavisDom Davis

@Idomdavis

If there ever were two peoples divided by a common language it’s “IT” and “The Business”; two poorly defined groups of people who spend a lot of time misunderstanding each other and believing that the others simply “don’t get it”, or “don’t have a clue”. While the latter claim is borne out of frustration, there is some weight to the former. In this session we’ll peel back the mind of a developer and show how what seem like simple requests can hide hideous complexity, and be wide open for misinterpretation. Aimed at everyone, including the whole spectrum of “IT” and “The Business”, hopefully we’ll learn to better communicate and avoid the common pitfalls that catch out so many IT projects.

About Dom

Dom Davis is a veteran of The City and a casualty of The Financial Crisis. Not content with bringing the world to its knees he then went off to help break the internet before winding up in Norfolk where he is now CTO and technology evangelist at a rapidly growing startup. Dom is an enthusiastic and impassioned speaker [read: he gabbles] who uses a blend of irreverent sarcasm and flippant humour to bring complex subjects to a broad audience. Whether or not they understand him is up for debate, but he likes to believe they do.

 

Abusing C# More

Jon SkeetJon Skeet

(@jonskeet)

@jonskeet

What language could be complete without some horrible abuse? If you can’t do terrible, evil things with it, how could you ever create works of great art?

Of course, anyone can write plain bad code. The trick for really evil code is to make it attractive; to make it seduce you with it’s utility, brevity and general glamour. Pierce that attractive exterior though, and the horrors are revealed; twisting language features into shapes they were never intended to take.

As C# has evolved as a language, as its feature surface expands; new crevices can be found, containing as-yet unseen terrors.

What language could be complete without some horrible abuse. Google Engineer, Feminist and author Jon Skeet presents the unseen terrors of C# and some of the terrible, evil things you can do with it.

Hybrid code-gen: designing cloud service client libraries

How do you want to interact with cloud services? How can they feel idiomatic in your preferred language, as if they were hand-written and lovingly curated, just for you? How much ugliness are you prepared to put up with in order to use an awesome service?

Sometimes, there just isn’t enough time to craft a separate library from scratch for each language and each cloud API, so code generation gets involved – at least for statically-typed languages. The result is often less than fully satisfactory. How can this situation get better? How can hand-written code augment generated code, without hampering API evolution or backing the user into a corner?

This talk uses the Google Cloud Platform and C# as an example platform/language pair, but the library design lessons learned can be applied in many other situations – considerations such as testability, versioning, documentation, expected use cases, and expected user experience levels.

Don’t come expecting to get the right answers for your particular situation – but at least you’ll have some of the right questions.

C# 7

C# 7 is nearly here! The Visual Studio 2017 release candidate is available, and nearly all of the planned C# 7 features are in there. Tuples, pattern matching, local functions, throw expressions, numeric literals and more… Come and find out what the future has in store, including a sneak peek at what might be in later versions.

 

Developing Microsoft Communication Apps for your Office 365-powered Organisation

Tom MorganTom Morgan

@tomorgan  

Better communication is coming to the workplace (spoiler alert: there will be no demos of email!). The way we interact with each other is changing and that means opportunities for us to take advantage and build the products of tomorrow, today. We can ignore these changes until it’s too late, or we can embrace them and enjoy the competitive edge they will give us. Aimed at organisations on the Office365 stack this talk will explore what’s new, why you should care and how you can benefit both as an organisation and as a developer, and will include demos of Microsoft Teams, and the Bot Framework.

About Tom

Tom is an Microsoft Skype for Business developer and Microsoft MVP with over 10 years experience in the software development industry. For the last 4 years he has worked at Modality Systems, a specialist provider of Universal Communications services, where he produces software which interacts with Microsoft Lync/Skype for Business. As a Senior Development Consultant he is responsible for designing, developing and deploying development services projects for a varied client list including FTSE 100 companies, multi-national corporations, government organisations and charities, as well as maintaining and developing Modality’s product line of Communication Enabled Business Process (CEBP) applications. He is passionate about creating great software that people will find useful. He blogs about Microsoft Skype for Business development on his blog ThoughtStuff with plenty of code samples and freely available Skype for Business products.

 

Security Myths and Legends

Steve LoveSteve Love

@IAmSteveLove

Cyber Security is a term that has such a nice ring to it. So nice it seems to have become a turnoff for many people. In cyber-space the threats and risks are real, but it’s not always easy to tell fact from fantasy. This is a talk about why security matters to everyone, and includes some practical examples of what programmers can and must do to improve it.

About Steve

Steve Love is an eclectic programmer who is fascinated by the applications of technology and its consequences. He is the founder of Perfect Cobalt Cyber Security.

 

Bringing The Things Network to Norfolk and Suffolk

Paul FosterPaul Foster

The Things Network (TTN) is an open source, crowd funded IoT Network using the LoRAWAN network technology. Network hubs and devices have ranges of multiple kilometres and hubs can support tens of thousands of devices. Hubs can be built using the Raspberry Pi and a network frequency concentrator board. Devices can be easily built using LoRA SOC and microcontrollers such as the Arduino and Adafruit Feather. In this session, we will show the deployment and coverage so far of TTN, how you can participate in it by providing/hosting a hub and easily building sensors for circa £20. Get started with IoT Innovation in East Anglia!

 

About Paul

Since joining Microsoft in 1994, Paul Foster has worked across a wide range of sectors and with a wide range of customers, providing a mix of technical and strategic guidance around the creative use of technology in relation to their business needs.

As an established public speaker across Europe and having spent a considerable amount of time working on the cutting edge of technology providing leadership and inspiration on topics like Smart Devices, Cloud Computing, Education and App Development, Paul is currently working as a Principal Technical Evangelist for Microsoft UK’s Developer Experience Group, focusing on the building of next generation sensor webs which automate the gathering of data from disparate sources, and how to enable the creative analysis of this data to start a new era of perception. For a short time Paul was a member of a high-wire flying trapeze circus troupe, and is a keen roboticist.

 

 

Cryptomalware: The Huge Threat of Today

Todor Lalev

What is cryptomalware and how cybercriminals create it.

About Todor

I try to become better every day in all areas of my life. I value personal privacy and my aim is to provide quality service to others who share my values. My objective is to become an outstanding professional capable of delivering exceptional products.

 


mobileMOBILE TRACK

I’ve been doing some syncing…

PaulLammertsmaPaul Lammertsma, CTO, Pixplicity

@officesunshine

Storing account information is a common challenge many app developers face, and is often tackled in tailored solutions. Isn’t there some strategy to store account credentials in a centralized place?

What about multiple accounts, like Twitter? What about security concerns? And when should or could I synchronize data?

Android offers a powerful—and underrated—account manager. Let’s explore the possibilities together and lay out an architecture for engineering an Android app based on accounts.

About Paul

Passionate about android, co-founder of Pixplicity Paul Lammertsma talks about the challenges developers face when storing account data, and how Android’s accountmanager might cure the headache.

Paul found his way into mobile technologies through mobile device interaction and his need to scratch an itch for entrepreneurship. Co-founding Pixplicity in 2011, Paul has helped grow the company into a familiar name between Dutch app builders, with brands such as De Telegraaf, Consumentenbond and Mercedes-Benz. His passion for Android has always compelled him to keep up with the latest developments and share knowledge by contributing into the open-source and co-organizing GDG The Dutch Android User Group. He can frequently be seen giving ‘as-technical-as-technically-possible’ tech talks & workshops at conferences across the globe.

 

Mobile Development and a DevOps Mentality

Ben WalpoleBen Walpole

@bwalpoleuk    

The DevOps movement is a natural extension to the application of agile principles. If we are good at writing software and utilising IT why would we not complete the circle and use these skills to help us deliver our products.

If you work in mobile development sometimes this can seem like a foreign land, the way we build and deploy software can on first inspection not seem to fit with these ideas but it’s simple a matter of degrees, we can achieve the same results.

About Ben

A techie who arrived at being a Software Architect via working as a Hardware Engineer, Firmware Engineer and a Software Engineer. Currently plying my trade in the mobile development realm.

The DevOps movement is a natural extension to the application of agile principles. Hardware Engineer gone Software Architect Ben Walpole talks about how the DevOps mentality can work in Mobile Development.

 

Mobile Security – The Deep End

james taylorJames Taylor – Proxama

@jmons

A look at the current available options when it comes to writing high security modules to run on consumer grade mobile phones. Looking at Trusted Execution Environment, Knox, Whiteboxing and other technologies. A technical guide with no code whatsoever.

About James

James works at Proxama by day inventing new and interesting methods of financial fraud, and works on various startups at night (@getimperium, tether). He despises all programming languages, but some more than others, and is currently the NorDevCon “Just a Minute : Technical Edition” standing champion (mainly due to a rant about PHP). (This profile contains an annoying mismatched bracket.

 

Acceptance Testing: Getting your iOS/Mobile Apps right early! (..and then keeping them that way)

Paul StringerPaul Stringer

@paulstringer

Acceptance Testing is one of the essential components of a healthy software development process; unfortunately on Mobile this typically results in the creation of slow, brittle and highly complex UI automation based tests. These can leave development teams and businesses left wondering, is it worth it? By revisiting fundamentals this talk explores the role it should play in driving collaboration between business and software and how it can be best applied in Mobile.

In this talk we discover an alternative approach to UI based testing. Through using Fitnesse (a lightweight, open-source testing framework) we walk through an example of how to implement Acceptance Tests on iOS that are blazing fast, rock-solid and actually improve the architecture of your app’s software. Increase you and your team’s productivity and discover the secret to answering the question “Can we submit yet?” in seconds instead not days.

 

Cross platform mobile development with the power of Microsoft & Xamarin

Christos MatskasChristos Matskas

@ChristosMatskas

Are you a .NET developer? Do you develop for mobile platforms or would you like to get started but you don’t know how or where? Then you should join Christos Matskas to show you how to get off the ground with mobile application development using Xamarin and explains how to build powerful, full-featured, native applications that can run across all platforms. You will learn how to speed up your development cycle, reduce overhead costs and create “the one codebase to rule them all”.

About Christos

Christos Matskas has been working as a software developer for the last 12 years. He is an entrepreneur, founder and CEO of SoftwareLounge, a software consultancy firm. His portfolio includes collaborations with some great companies such as MarkIT, Lockheed Martin and Barclays. Over the years he has worked on numerous exciting projects from mobile applications to data crunching back-end solutions. He writes about his adventures in software development on his blog https://cmatskas.com. Christos is an advocate of Open Source Software and a regular contributor to numerous projects. He’s passionate about public speaking and he regularly speaks at conferences and user groups about .NET, the Cloud, mobile applications and software development in general (.NETFringe, DevWeek, MDevCon, SwanseaCon, Software Architect).

 

Daydream believer

Steve CharmanSteve Charman

@MrChaz

In this talk I intend to take a lightly technical look at the world of VR with the intention of making you excited  to get involved. We’ll take a tour of the hardware available today and its capabilities as well as what the future may hold via a brief detour into AR. Finally, I hope to show how easy it is to take your first steps with Unity and Google Daydream.

About Stephen

Stephen has spent the last eight years or so writing Android software. Before that he spent  around 5 years working mostly with C# .NET. Occasionally a hobbyist game developer, always curious about new technology and APIs Stephen is currently exploring VR and AR.

 

Breaking out of the box, an overview of mobile VR

James BurrowsJames Burrows

@immersivevr    

Whilst high-end consumer VR is grabbing all the headlines at the moment, not everyone has the money to drop upwards of £2K on a high-end gaming rig to drive an Oculus Rift or HTC VIVE. Some sort of mobile VR experience will most likely be the first taste of VR that most people will have. It’s slowly invading people’s homes and lives with Samsung and Google giving away headset hardware with their latest devices.

In this session we’ll be covering the current state of mobile VR, the hardware, the tools and the best practices which are commonly used to produce VR content. We’ll discuss how to avoid common creative pitfalls and talk about hardware limitations and optimisation tricks.

We’ll also talk about how mobile VR as a category is constantly evolving and changing and where the future lies over the next year or so. Finally we’ll touch upon the state of mobile AR and how this has the potential to be an even bigger opportunity than VR in the not so distant future.

About Ben

As a self-confessed uber-geek James has spent the majority of his career in highly technical roles, ranging from pure software development to experiential marketing. He cut his teeth working in the main IT agency of the British Government’s Cabinet Office, before moving into the private sector, firstly in publishing and later in Digital Marketing. Over the course of his career he has led development teams in three different digital marketing agencies and have often worked in an independent capacity as both a freelance developer and digital technology consultant.

More recently he has been fascinated with all forms of immersive marketing, previously writing his own Augmented Reality system, becoming an early adopter of emerging VR technologies and co-founding Immersive VR nearly two years ago.

During his career he has been proud to work on projects for such major brands as Mazda, Barclays, Aviva, Nestle, Rightmove, Sainsbury’s, Yamaha, IKEA and many more.

 


briefcase BUSINESS TRACK

Leadership and technology – past present and future

Nigel CushionNigel Cushion, Nelson Spirit

@nelsonspirit  

Why leadership and technology go together. Why Norfolk has led in past, is leading now, and will continue to lead in the future. How technology is making “management” obsolete but leaders are needed as they always have been. How do we support and encourage leaders to help Norfolk stay at the front of the curve?

About Nigel

Nigel is the founder and Chairman of Nelson Spirit, a social impact business supporting and developing leaders.

Nigel is an international thought leader in leadership development, a leadership fellow at St George’s House Windsor Castle, and Chairman of award-winning manufacturer Frank Dale Foods. He has also chaired of the IoD in Norfolk and a number of fast growth businesses and is a NED/Trustee of various youth charities.

 

Digital vs Physical: future of social

Neil GarnerNeil Garner

@Nrgarner

How technologies in mobile devices allow us to better connect digital experiences into physical world contexts to either enhance power of existing digital social networks to control our lives or maybe helping to re-build our connections to real world experiences, brands and relationships.

About Neil

Neil founded Proxama in 2005 (then called Glue4 Technologies). The business focused on creating services that link people and brands using consumer technologies. In 2008, the company was rebranded as Proxama with a focus on the applications of mobile, smartcard and NFC technologies. Neil passionately believes in using emerging technologies to create valuable services for people.

Prior to founding Proxama, Neil ran a division of a niche consultancy, Consult Hyperion, where he led the systems implementation teams for a number of ground breaking products including Vodafone’s m-Pesa, MasterCard’s PayPass, Sky and Barclaycard’s SkyCard and American Express Blue card.

Neil has a MEng and DPhil from York University and is a Chartered Engineer. Any precious time at home is split between renovating an old property and enjoying life with his wife and three young children.

 

Getting the Technology Religion : Building Winning Business Opportunities with Technology

John ParkJohn Park

@DrDisrupTeK  

In this talk I will share the simple principles I use to identify how changes in the external environment are changing consumers needs and aspirations.  I will explore how to use this process to develop clear understanding of their emerging needs.  But how do we find the solution? The world is filled with a myriad of emerging technologies often developed in isolation but when skilfully combined can produce the solution to consumers emerging needs.  They can become a proprietary solution at the very heart of new technology products and services.  

I will provide some simple tools that you can use to evaluate opportunities, not just in terms of their financial viability but also in terms of their fit with your aspirations as an entrepreneur or technologist.  

Building a tech business is hard work so make sure it is one with real customers and a product they will love, one that you will wake up energised and eager to work on every morning and not another just day at the office you will dread, trying to build a product no one want to buy.

About John

Using on-demand digital media to inspire & coach entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs to create new business opportunities by commercialising new technology.

Technology business strategy is what I live and breathe. As a senior R&D executive with the Procter & Gamble and PepsiCo International corporations I built three world class organisations transforming technology into multi million $ business opportunities. My biggest success was converting my PhD science into a globally patented stain removal technology for Ariel Future, a brand with sales of £500MM/yr.

As a serial technology entrepreneur and award winning academic my current focus is on using digital technology to coach nascent technology entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs how to build a technology business opportunity. I am piloting this globally as a visiting Senior Lecturer on the Aberdeen Business School MBA programme at the Robert Gordon University and as a commercial venture via DisrupTeK Ltd. I am convinced there is a paradigm shift taking place in how we deliver education. In the future it will be on demand, and primarily in the digital domain, built around the needs of the student or customer.

I am currently seeking project opportunities for DisrupTeK. I would actively consider leadership roles in organisations with similar ambitious plans to develop & deliver large scale 21st century digital education programmes, or executive leadership positions challenged with building more effective strategies and delivery mechanisms to commercialise new technology.

 

The future of technology recruitment: key trends you need to be aware of if you’re wanting to hire or get hired in the tech sector

Mark FletcherMark Fletcher, Cooper-Lomaz

@cooperlomaz  

 

Come along for a whistle stop tour of what’s happening locally in the tech sector.  Which skills are hot and which are not?  What’s happening to salaries and day rates?  In a crowded market how do you make your business stand out as the place to be?  With so many options for looking for a job on and offline how do you position yourself to get access to the best jobs in tech?

About Mark

Mark has worked in the recruitment industry for 15 years.  He is a Director at Cooper Lomaz Recruitment – the region’s largest independent IT recruitment consultancy.  He’s passionate about both the technological and people aspects of 21st century recruitment.  He lives in Norwich with his wife Rachel, their two boys and an ever growing collection of cool and quirky guitars.

 

What does an investor want from a startup?

David BozwardDavid Bozward

@bozward  

It’s so easy, just three things, a product, a willing market and a team to make it happen. So in this session we will be looking at the good, bad and ugly of presenting this to investors and what is a good product, market or team? In this interactive session we all explore what is needed to get an investor’s interest.

About David

Dr. David Bozward is a serial technology entrepreneur, educator, mentor and authority on international youth entrepreneurship and education with over 20 years entrepreneurial business experience.

David is currently strategic lead for Entrepreneurship within Worcester Business School, developing an environment for developing entrepreneurs and growing businesses. He is programme leader for BA Entrepreneurship, a three year degree which develops the student as an entrepreneur, a business owner and also a responsible leader.

 

Mission Impossible? Maximise your profit and create more time for yourself!

Larking Gowen by Mark Curtis and Chris Greeves

Mark CurtisMark Curtis

@MarkCurtis9

Chris GreevesChris Greeves

Would you like to unlock the secrets behind making more profit with minimum efforts and at the same time creating more time to do the things you really want to?  If so then this is the session for you.  It will be followed by a workshop which will enable you to leave the day with some clear ideas and actions to implement into your business and also how you can work with your clients to help achieve the same.

About Mark

Having spent most of his professional career advising both businesses and private clients through the financial maze of modern life, Mark is well placed to give guidance and pro-active advice on all aspects of today’s accountancy and financial needs. Offering professional advice with the aim of building up a relationship of trust, reliability and success.

About Chris

Chris enjoys building long lasting relationships with his clients. He is the first point of call for advice on any professional matters and prefers to act as a critical friend advising and supporting his clients. Socialising in owner managed businesses of all sizes, with particular experience in the agricultural and manufacturing sectors. He also specialises in business development, tax and estate planning (business and capital taxes), succession and exit planning, auditing.

 

The Happy Medium: Finding the balance between agile and waterfall

Asti ByroAsti Byro

@MsAsti

Surely there is a middle ground between the fuzziness of agile and the rigidity of waterfall? Astrid will explore options to add structure to your agile projects and  flexibility to your waterfall projects in this interactive Q&A session.

About Asti

Astrid Byro is Head of Project Management at Comanaco, specialising in information management solutions for global enterprises and has been in the business for over 15 years. Astrid has done projects in the construction, transport, asset management, engineering, petrochemical, banking, insurance, agrichemical and utilities industries.

She has developed particular expertise in the field of distributed collaboration and is known for her “extreme teleworking”, in particular running her team from the Himalaya, and is currently experimenting with managing a project via satellite from a container ship.

She hopes, one day, to retire to run a small third-world country.

 

Predicting the Future – Starting a New Business in this Innovative Area

Neil Miles, Inasight Ltd

In this session Neil will share some of the latest thinking and practical use of predictive analytics and machine learning in business today as well as sharing some of his own experiences in founding a new start-up business.

About Neil

As Co-founder and CEO of Inasight, Neil has an extensive background exclusive to the Technology sector, founding and growing a number of highly successful and innovative companies. Recently accelerating the growth at ANDigital, a start-up digital disruptor and previously well known as CEO of Smart421 (now Kcom PLC), creating an Enterprise Market Leader in public cloud adoption. Neil is also Chairman of TechEast, the not for profit organisation, promoting and supporting the digital technology sector across the Eastern region.

 


arrows-50 AGILE TRACK

Individuals and Interactions

Kevlin Henney

@KevlinHenney  

Given the commoditisation of process certification and the heavy emphasis on tooling, it sometimes feels as if the first value of the Agile Manifesto has been retconned to be “Processes and tools over individuals and interactions”. It turns out, however, that people matter. And understanding people is a tricky business. They don’t reason as reasonably as they would like to believe. And when more than one is involved, things get really interesting — sometimes good interesting, sometimes not-so-good interesting.
This talk takes a look at some of the cognitive biases, communication issues and group dynamics that affect and arise from individuals and their interactions, touching on questions of diversity, team size and effects on code and architecture.

About Kevlin

Kevlin is an independent consultant, trainer, reviewer and writer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for various magazines and websites, a contributor to open source software and a member of more committees than is probably healthy. Kevlin is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series. He is also editor of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know.

 

We Don’t Need No Estimation

Adrian PickeringAdrian Pickering

@xiasma

Estimation is expensive.  We may spend a lot of energy on getting them “right”, which of course they never really are, and that time and effort that could instead be spent on doing the work for which we are estimating.  Or we can mislead ourselves and others with arbitrary numbers plucked from “experience” and “judgement” and set ourselves up for failure.
In this talk, I wistfully look back at how projects used to be planned, the rise and fall of Agile (with a big A) and wait patiently in line at Disney World only for no estimates to show up.

About Adrian

From the age of seven, when my family bought a Texas Instruments TI99/4A, I taught myself to programme in Beginners’ All-Purpose Symbolic Instruction Code.  By the time I was in secondary school, I was helping my school and a nearby primary school to configure, use and teach computing and programming.  I had also moved on from BASIC to 6502.  Throughout my formal education, I continued to volunteer and take paid IT work whilst studying for A-Levels and an honours degree in neuroscience.  In my spare time, I wrote for an American magazine about Commodore Amigas.  Pascal had become my language of choice.

Following graduation, I landed a job for a Norwich education company writing school and vocational textbooks and, later, imagining, designing and developing software in Delphi to complement the coursework. From there, a greater salary attracted me to a scientific software house in Oxford.  When that company made some common mistakes at the end of the dotcom era, I became self employed as a consultant, helping all manner of companies to improve their software and processes with a focus on the Microsoft technology stack.

I still hold a fondness for BASIC, even though I haven’t touched it for decades.  Or perhaps that’s why.

 

INVESTing in User Stories

Seb RoseSeb Rose

@Sebrose

How good are the user stories you work with? Do they help the team work well together or are they a bureaucratic box-ticking exercise that waste time and energy? In this session we’ll explore what a good user story should look like and explore why so many of them fail to live up to our expectations.

Many years ago Mike Cohn popularised the INVEST acronym to help people write better user stories. Unfortunately, in many cases, it doesn’t seem to have helped. We’ll unpick the acronym and see if we can’t construct a replacement that describes the key elements of a good user story in less ambiguous language.

 

Recycling tests in TDD

It’s not always easy to know which test to write next in TDD and some problems make this harder than others. In this session I will introduce you to a small problem that I find often causes difficulty. We’ll work through this together and try and understand why it was hard to solve test first.

Then I’ll introduce you to a way that I’ve been practicing that I’ve been calling “test recycling”.
We’ll walk through the problem again using this technique, and we’ll see if this might be useful in
other situations.

Finally, I’ll suggest an extension to the traditional wording of the 3 rules of TDD.

About Seb

Consultant, coach, designer, analyst and developer for over 30 years.

Seb has been involved in the full development lifecycle with experience that ranges from Architecture to Support, from BASIC to Ruby. He’s a partner in Cucumber Limited, who help teams adopt and refine their agile practices, with a particular focus on collaboration and automated testing.

Regular speaker at conferences and occasional contributor to software journals. Contributing author to “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” (O’Reilly) and lead author of “The Cucumber for Java Book” (Pragmatic Programmers).

 

Perfect software: the enemy of continuous delivery?

Sally GobleSally Goble

@sallygoble

In the olden days of waterfall delivery, shipping future-proofed, fully specified, all-singing-all-dancing products with a complete exhaustive feature set was commonsense. Software needed to be specified with every eventuality considered, to within an inch of it’s life, because future releases wouldn’t be for months or – more likely – years.

But now it’s different. Successful implementation of continuous delivery allows us to ship many many times a day. And if we can do that, why do we need to be obsessed with getting things right – or perfect – first time?  Too many teams fret about making software perfect before shipping – putting the brakes on faster delivery whilst agonising about every decision.

Yet product/feature development has responded to the changing pace of delivery, and now MVP and experimentation are the norm –  in theory if not in practice. In this talk I suggest that software delivery teams could do well to learn lessons from product: UX research, testing, and design teams need to become more comfortable with the possibility of shipping imperfect software. Whether that means bypassing the UX lab and focus groups, letting bugs slip into production – at the same time finding ways to take our users on that journey with us.

I’ll look at what how, at the Guardian, we learned to let go and what we still struggle with.

About Sally

Sally Goble is Head of Quality at the Guardian, and has worked on almost every product that the Guardian has produced, from the glamorous to the offbeat. She has worked in software development for more than 10 years. In her current role, she is at the forefront of leading a change in the way the QA team thinks about improving quality of products – moving away from conventional testing towards more tooling and process changes. She is also one of fewer than 500 women to have swum the English Channel solo.

 

Test Driving Swift To The Max – with or without the tests!

Phil NashPhil Nash

@phil_nash

Swift is the new systems language from Apple – aimed at iOS and Mac development. TDD has not been as central to these ecosystems as its has to some others – but it is still very much alive!

We’ll look any some techniques for streamlining the process of writing and working with tests – and how JetBrains’ AppCode can mitigate many common pain points.

Swift itself brings some new tricks to the table that can allow us to rethink the traditional process of TDD – and question whether we even need the tests at all!

About Phil

Phil is a semi-independent software developer, coach and consultant – working in as diverse fields as finance, agile coaching and iOS development. A long time C++ developer he also has his feet in Swift, Objective-C, F# and C# – as well as dabbling in other languages. He is the author of several open source projects – most notably Catch: a C++ and Objective-C test framework.

 

Planning for Value

Allan KellyAllan Kelly

@allankellynet

Software development is overwhelmingly planned on the basis of cost and time. Unfortunately this doesn’t work too well. Worse still there is always someone, somewhere, who will offer a lower price – even if they can’t actually deliver for that price or in that time.

Agile has made things worse. Agile has raised expectations, after all, everyone knows “Agile” means “Faster, better and cheaper”. But most of the agile toolkit improves the supply of software, Agile as we know it says very little about the demand side of the equation.

The only way to break this vicious circle is switch to the value side of the equation. We need to look at the benefit software brings and plan on the basis of value rather than cost. Fortunately we have the technology! Stories, return on investment, cost of delay and planning horizons provide the answers.

In this presentation Allan Kelly will discuss how to use benefit to drive software planning and how this approach supports the #NoProjects agenda.

About Allan

Allan Kelly http://www.allankelly.net has worked with many companies and teams to help them make better software in a better way. Usually this goes by the name of Agile or Lean and increasingly Continuous. He takes a holistic approach, working with the whole team from developers to product managers. Most of his clients are digital – software intensive companies whose very business depends on software.

He is the originator of Retrospective Dialogue Sheets and Value Poker, the author of four books, including “Xanpan – team centric Agile Software Development” and “Business Patterns for Software Developers”. On twitter he is @allankellynet.

 


hammersaw-50 THURSDAY WORKSHOPS

Paradigms Lost, Paradigms Regained: Programming with Objects, Functions and More

Kevlin HenneyKevlin Henney

@KevlinHenney  

It is very easy to get stuck in one way of doing things. This is as true of programming as it is of life. Although a programming paradigm represents a set of stylistic choices, it is much more than this: a programming also represents a way of thinking. Having only one way to think about problems is too limiting. A programming paradigm represents a set of patterns of problem framing and solving and contains the ingredients of software architecture. As Émile Auguste Chartier noted, there is nothing more dangerous than an idea when you have only one idea.

Perhaps even more problematic than being stuck with a narrow view of paradigms, is being stuck with a dysfunctional view of each paradigm. For instance, many developers working in languages and frameworks that support object orientation have a strong idea of the principles of interaction, data abstraction and granularity that support an effective view of OO, and instead surround themselves with manager objects, singletons and DTOs.

During the day we will explore the strengths and weaknesses of different programming styles, patterns, paradigms, languages, etc., with examples and opportunity for discussion.

About Kevlin

Kevlin is an independent consultant, trainer, reviewer and writer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for various magazines and websites, a contributor to open source software and a member of more committees than is probably healthy. Kevlin is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series. He is also editor of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know.

 

BDD Fundamentals

Seb Rose

@Sebrose

This course gives a thorough introduction to BDD, which is the process that Cucumber supports. There is no automation – the focus is on analysis and collaboration techniques. So, it is suitable for the whole team (BAs, product owners, domain experts, UX designers, developers, testers, and any other important stakeholders).

We’ll teach you Example Mapping – a powerful technique we have developed to help business, IT and QA break requirements down into concrete examples. This exposes misunderstandings early and will help you write better executable specifications and automated tests later.

Learning outcomes:

  • The fundamental principles and practices of BDD
  • The importance of Rules and Examples
  • Translating examples into Gherkin – Cucumbers format for executable specifications
  • Conversation patterns for discovering edge cases
  • The importance of a ubiquitous language for problems and solutions
  • Using Example Mapping and Discovery Workshops to achieve shared understanding
  • Roles and responsibilities on a BDD team

About Seb

Consultant, coach, designer, analyst and developer for over 30 years.

Seb has been involved in the full development lifecycle with experience that ranges from Architecture to Support, from BASIC to Ruby. He’s a partner in Cucumber Limited, who help teams adopt and refine their agile practices, with a particular focus on collaboration and automated testing.

Regular speaker at conferences and occasional contributor to software journals. Contributing author to “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” (O’Reilly) and lead author of “The Cucumber for Java Book” (Pragmatic Programmers).

 


hammersaw-50 CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

iOS Testing Tools

Paul StringerPaul Stringer

@paulstringer

Are you interested in testing? Are you ready to learn some of the best practices integrating common test tools with iOS projects? Join us for this hands on testing workshop!
Testing is an essential part of the Agile software development process and in recent years the tools supporting testing on iOS have evolved to become some of the best in the industry. You will learn over how to use these tools with the best practices and principles to use them well.
These skills provide an essential foundation for the modern iOS developer to craft iOS apps that are high quality, regression & bug free as-well as a pleasure to code and work with; not just for the first few weeks, but for months and even years.

Learn how to:

  • Answer the question “can we submit?” in seconds not days
  • Write maintainable tests that help you build Apps that get better not worse
  • Understand different considerations when testing Obj-C v Swift code
  • Use tests to improve and change existing legacy code
  • Spot and avoid common testing anti-patterns
  • Understand acceptance testing and the role it plays in Agile software development
  • Use Acceptance tests to drive more efficient development
  • Work with FitNesse (an open source Wiki and acceptance testing frameworks

 

The Bots are Coming: Create your own Skype Bot in .NET

Tom MorganTom Morgan

@tomorgan  

There has been a big rise in the use and promotion of Bots in the past year. Social media platforms like Skype, Slack and Facebook are providing new frameworks for bots to allow companies to connect with their users. Bots can open up new business-to-consumer (B2C) opportunities in providing information and triaging incoming requests. Machine learning has matured to the point where mere mortal developers can implement it into their own applications and create natural interactions with their users. But how do you build a Bot? In this workshop we’re going to design and create a new Skype Bot from scratch, use machine learning to translate user requests into actions, and publish it for use with Skype. You’ll come away knowing how to build a Skype Bot for your company, and what you can do with it. This will be an interactive session, so make sure you have Skype installed on your phone and bring a laptop with Visual Studio installed so you can join in! Please also ensure that you have a Microsoft Azure account setup to use the machine learning parts of this workshop. Go to azure.microsoft.com/en-gb/free/ to set up a free account.

About Tom

Tom is an Microsoft Skype for Business developer and Microsoft MVP with over 10 years experience in the software development industry. For the last 4 years he has worked at Modality Systems, a specialist provider of Universal Communications services, where he produces software which interacts with Microsoft Lync/Skype for Business. As a Senior Development Consultant he is responsible for designing, developing and deploying development services projects for a varied client list including FTSE 100 companies, multi-national corporations, government organisations and charities, as well as maintaining and developing Modality’s product line of Communication Enabled Business Process (CEBP) applications. He is passionate about creating great software that people will find useful. He blogs about Microsoft Skype for Business development on his blog ThoughtStuff with plenty of code samples and freely available Skype for Business products.

 

Functional Programming in JavaScript

Dominic KendrickDominic Kendrick

@dominickendrick

Pascal HonorePascal Honore

Joseph SmithJoseph Smith

Over the past few years there has been a great resurgence of interest in functional programming. With higher-order functions, closures and lambdas, JavaScript has supported functional programming right from the beginning – it just took a long time for people to notice. Once described as “Lisp in C’s clothing”, JavaScript brought these concepts into the mainstream.
We will be looking at how to implement these patterns and techniques in JavaScript.
In this workshop you will learn:

  • What functional programming is.
  • Why it is important.
  • How to use these techniques in your day-to-day Javascript code.
  • What other libraries and frameworks we can use to take these concepts further.

This workshop is aimed at JavaScript developers looking to improve their knowledge of functional programming

About Dom

Dominic has been a software developer for 10 years. He has worked in small agencies and larger companies such as Amnesty International and The Guardian. He currently works at The Guardian as a team leader and senior full stack developer. He enjoys writing Scala and Javascript and making dashboards.

About Pascal

After starting his career on the trading floor, Pascal went to mathematical research while being a CTO and more recently decided that he wanted to work for a news organisation. Interested in various aspect of mathematics, technology and science, he wishes that he had discovered Functional Programming sooner in his life.

About Joseph

Joseph is a senior software engineer at the Guardian. He’s been fascinated by lambdas ever since he studied linguistics and used them to represent meaning in human language. Since then he’s written functional code in Scala and JavaScript and in his spare time even a little in Haskell and Clojure. When not obsessing over lambdas he can usually be found playing piano.

 

Mission Impossible

Larking Gowen by Mark Curtis and Chris Greeves

Mark CurtisMark Curtis

@MarkCurtis9

Chris GreevesChris Greeves

Following on for the session on how to unlock the secrets behind making more profit with minimum efforts and at the same time creating more time to do the things you really want to. This work shop which will enable you to leave the day with some clear ideas and actions to implement into your business and also how you can work with your clients to help achieve the same.

About Mark

Having spent most of his professional career advising both businesses and private clients through the financial maze of modern life, Mark is well placed to give guidance and pro-active advice on all aspects of today’s accountancy and financial needs. Offering professional advice with the aim of building up a relationship of trust, reliability and success.

About Chris

Chris enjoys building long lasting relationships with his clients. He is the first point of call for advice on any professional matters and prefers to act as a critical friend advising and supporting his clients. Socialising in owner managed businesses of all sizes, with particular experience in the agricultural and manufacturing sectors. He also specialises in business development, tax and estate planning (business and capital taxes), succession and exit planning, auditing.